Farmers Market Prayers

Newmarket Baptist Church @ Flemington Farmers Market 2013

Call to Worship

blessed be god the word…

who came to his own and his own received him not…

for in this way god glorifies the stranger…

(all) Oh God, show us your image in all we meet today that we may welcome them, and you,through Jesus Christ our Lord.

connecting our bodies with a good but broken creation, groaning and yearning for redemption (romans 8)

we acknowledge that we gather on the land of which the Wurundjeri have been custodians from time immemorial. (acts 17:26-27)

We honour this history and commit ourselves to care for the land with them.

May our worship and our service be work for reconciliation with people, God and all creation.

(We say together…) Jesus, light of the world, we confess that you are here. Shine your light into the hidden places of our lives, and bring warmth to the cold places of our hearts.  Amen.

 

Lord’s Prayer Peditation 

(praying one syllable per step):

Ab-ba Fa-ther God,
Bless your ho-ly name,
(rest 3 steps)

Let your reign now come,
Let your will be done.
(rest 3 steps)

Bring your peace to birth.
As in heav’n, so earth.
(rest 3 steps)

Give us bread, daily;
Free us, as we free.
(rest 3 steps)

Come, O God, creator who fills the earth with seeds for us to plant and grains to feed us. Come, Jesus Christ, who saw in ordinary seeds and trees and flowers and fields, a vision of God’s reign, God’s Economy among us.Come, Holy Spirit, who energizes us and nourishes our lives.

There is nothing more religious than what we produce and consume.  Fill our hearts with your voice and us with your presence.

Our story of Genesis is a ‘liturgy of abundance’ where we were created from the earth, your adam-ah, to produce and consume, tending a fruitful creation.

There is nothing more religious than what we produce and consume.  Fill our hearts with your voice and us with your presence.

The same story describes our fallenness as coming from an act of consumption in defiance of your limitations resulting in us working in systems of production and consumption that are described as cursed. We confess our own selfish food securing actions and slavery in the economies in which we participate.  We pray especially for those producers who are labouring by the sweat of their brow and are cursed by the bonds of environmental and economic domination and exploitation.  We pray for consumers who have no physical or financial access to the food they need and those who will go hungry this day.  May your spirit inspire us to share our resources with those who have nothing.

There is nothing more religious than what we produce and consume.  Fill our hearts with your voice and us with your presence.

Walter Brueggemann suggests that much of the Hebrew Bible “records the contest between the liturgy of generosity and the myth of scarcity—a contest that still tears us apart today.”

Abraham’s feast with Angels at Mamre where you promised and abundant blessing to the nations versus the scarcity of the feast at Sodom where your same Angels where refused refugee and exploited.

Joseph Sold into slavery by his brothers in Egypt. Same brothers seeking food in a time of drought Pharaoh who “introduces the principle of scarcity into the world economy” when he tries to control and monopolize the food supply in (Genesis 47)

Moses who leads his people to freedom from that same Egyptian slavery through.  Your provision of manna and water in the wilderness.

Elijah who you fed and shared your abundance of jars oil and meal with a poor widow and her son in Zarepeth in a time of drought. 1 Kings 17

John the Baptist who preached another way living in the scarcity of the wilderness living on your abundance of locusts and wild honey.

For the times in our own lives and stories when we become aware of the painful reality of scarcity and generous grace of  abundance.

We pray for the way this contest still tears us, our families and our world apart today.

There is nothing more religious than what we produce and consume.  Fill our hearts with your voice and us with your presence.

In Jesus’ life and teachings, stories, events, and images related to food and eating are a recurrent theme. Jesus’ parables speak of yeast and bread; seeds, growing plants, and harvests; fish; and banquets. Miracles of loaves and fishes and wine at weddings  teaching trust in sharing and in God’s abundance. Stories of feasts and banquets as a metaphor for the reign of God itself.

Jesus said… by their fruits you shall know them…

There is nothing more religious than what we produce and consume.  Fill our hearts with your voice and us with your presence.

Jesus describes himself as “the bread of life” and shares bread and wine in the last supper as signs of the new covenant. The word that Jesus would have used for bread in Aramaic—lachma—derives from the same root as the word for wisdom—hochma—and can be understood metaphorically as “embodied wisdom” (Douglas-Klotz, 1990). This reveals a deep insight—that our food, fruit of creation and of thousands of years of selective breeding, embodies the wisdom of human culture drawing on the greater wisdom of the Earth itself.

We pray for the wisdom to produce and consume our bread justly.  We pray especially for peasants and indigenous communities who’s wisdom has been protecting, organizing and contributing to the world’s seed supply for generations. Let us stand with them in solidarity as they continue to improve and exchange their locally-adapted seed varieties to adapt to our changing climate.  Fill us also with your wisdom to advocate peace that strengthens justice and justice that sustains peace. May the love and equality you share in your Trinity stimulate us to support just policies that ensure bread for all.

There is nothing more religious than what we produce and consume.  Fill our hearts with your voice and us with your presence.

Share Bread:  

In all that Jesus said and did, he proclaimed the reign of God. The original word for “kingdom” or “reign” in Aramaic, malkuta, can be understood as the “ruling principles that guide our lives towards unity” and wholeness. The word’s ancient roots portray the image of a “fruitful arm poised to create” or “a coiled spring ready to unwind with all the verdant potential of the earth… The ancients saw in the earth and all around them a divine quality that takes responsibility and says ‘I can’” (Douglas-Klotz, 1990, p. 20). As such, it conveys a much more organic and ecological image than English (or Greek) translations might at first indicate, something metaphorically closer to a kindom than a kingdom.  This malkuta’s sense of creativity, empowerment, and earthiness—ideas that often come through clearly in Jesus’ parables—are the antithesis of the logic and practice of empire. In terms of a food system, the malkuta evokes the idea of a more organic and ecological way of producing sustenance, one that respects the “verdant potential of the earth,” which takes responsibility by demonstrating care for creation and ensuring sustenance for all,empowering local communities

Share Cup.

There is nothing more religious than what we produce and consume.  Fill our hearts with your voice and us with your presence. 

We give thanks for those farmers who through their own work of production have shared with us something of your Great Economy of Grace and abundance today at Flemington Farmers Market.  We give thanks for…

Spring Creek Organic, Greens Organic Farm, Franada Family Farm Vegetables,  Lightwood Organic, The Mushroom Shed, Ian from Yapunyah Meadows Free Range Chicken, Dan from Dan’s Real Free Range Eggs, Flinders Island Lamb, Di from Watergrass Hill Angus, Guy from Tanjil Estate Pork, Lisadurne Hill Olive oil, Pure Peninsula Honey, Waltanna Flaxseed Oil, John Howell Apples, The Orange Lady, Beenak Farm Kiwi Fruit on their final day of the season, The Pastry Lounge, Pure Pies, Redbeard Bakery,  Rustic Sourdough Bakery, Boatshed Cheese, Vicki from Mountain View Organic Dairy, Shuki and Louisa, Pats Probiotic’s,  Misty Springs Preserves, Marree from BM Pet Snax,James from St James Walnuts, Tanjil Wines, Chef Michaels BBq Breakfast, Major Bakehouse Gozlemi…

There is nothing more religious than what we produce and consume.  Fill our hearts with your voice and us with your presence. Amen

http://www.united-church.ca/files/general-council/gce/2013/gce_1305_food.pdf 

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